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2008.11.21

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There was a 1968 movie entitled Wild in the Streets starring Shelley Winters in which teenagers take over the government and put all the adults into concentration camps (where they're forced to take LSD, iirc).

Incidentally, isn't that cover (to #94) even more deceptive than usual? Sure, the covers of DC comics of that era rarely if ever depicted scenes which actually took place in the book, but usually something happened in the book which at least vaguely resembled the cover.

Damn, and I've actually heard of that flick before. Had no idea that the concentration camp stuff was in there--Haney was a big movie-goer, I'm sure he saw it. Of course, I've got no idea how much influence he had over this particular cover, and you're absolutely right, it has nothing to do with the story beyond a real base connection...The Titans never get upset with Batman, they're on his side throughout. If it was some of the youth gang, then it would make a little sense. The way it's presented though, the cover is a total lie.

You're really kicking science with these. Is that Haney interview online?

Thanks Sean. No, unfortunately it isn't online--but in all seriousness, it really should be. It's really extensive and full of all kinds of really pointed shit-talking about various DC types. I'll probably include all the parts where Haney tells you how this or that person is "the sickest freak I ever met" or "dude was a fucking nerd."

Actually, that probably only interests me. The majority of the interview is him explaining a lot about his work methods, why and how he wrote the way he did--the only thing missing is more about his relationships with the artists. I wouldn't go so far as to say that the interview is a must-read for aspiring writers, but it's certainly one for anybody interested in DC during the time Haney worked there as well as anybody who just wants to read some of the funniest shit possible. It's in issues 276 and 278. 276 also has some great stuff by Jog, Chris Mautner & Tom Crippen. 278 is a round-up of some great reviews of Lost Girls, (all pretty negative), including Noah's tear down. They are all worth checking out.

My shop doesn't get the Journal, so I'm gonna have to add that to the list of things I've gotta look for when I'm out of town. The sickest freak was definitely Claremont, right? Or he wasn't at DC - Neal Adams?

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